Black Lives Matter

I am a black woman,

2020 has been emotionally and mentally tiring. During lockdown I have been quiet as I have had a lot going on personally and I have been trying to juggle helping people and work at the same time but yet again we are now dealing with a constant global issue- racism. During this time it’s not in my nature to keep quiet.

The impact of covid-19 and now the protests, news, murders, to say we are in a crisis is an understatement. The current events haven’t just impacted my current opinions and life but they have also brought back memories of racism in the past that I have handled and moved on from. From that I am a stronger person but I can’t help but think about others in the black community suffering with past and current circumstances. Not everyone can take to the streets and protest and not everyone feels comfortable speaking out but there’s also something that could be done.

  • Reach out- ask questions such as: how are you feeling? How’s your mental health? Do you want to talk about it? What state of mind are you in today? What impact does this have on you? Engage in this conversation; it’s important to listen but also acknowledge there is a problem and it’s time for conversations about race to no longer be considered as uncomfortable or awkward or aggression.
  • Petitions- sign petitions but also gain understanding on why petitions are create and why they’re necessary. Understand why donations are necessary and what they’re going towards. This week I have not only seen petitions to get justice for the victims but I have also seen and signed petitions linked to education. From my own experiences I can say the things I learnt about my culture and black history, it didn’t come from school. It came from family, resource, books, documentaries. That’s just me, I don’t know if other children/teens purposely seek out this information and it’s not up to children to make this decision. The education system especially in the UK has failed the black community. We briefly learnt about black history in terms what happened in the US but we don’t talk about the overall history; we don’t even talk about UK black history.
  • Educate- Linked to the point above but education doesn’t just stop when you turn 18. An element of racism stems from ignorance. You are never too old to pick up a book, to seek out resources. You are never too old to genuinely speak to a black person and ask them about their history and ask questions to educate yourself. Don’t be afraid to challenge what you thought you knew or what older generations in your family once told you about black people. I cannot stress education enough.

#blacklivesmatter

Do you know your family?

A year ago I went on an ancestry website to learn more about myself. I am lucky enough to have grown up my grandparents (on both sides) and hear all their stories but, I’ve always been interested in going as far back in time out of pure curiosity and to share our history with future generations.

I have always been aware of where I come from and my Bajan Gran has done her job to tell me everything about her childhood, how she came to England and what her parents were like. Also being Bajan she seems to know everything about everyone. My mum too has been great in sharing her memories and knowledge with me. Understanding our culture and history has always been important to my family and something I had to know about from a very young age.


I did my ancestry test back in October 2018 and to this day, the results still have me in awe. Doing the test is considered expensive to some but if you think about how they get the results, it’s really worth the cost. In March 2019 the technology updated meaning my results are considered more accurate as shown below. It’s extraordinary to see that I’m not just from Barbados and Jamaica (with an Indian twist) as I’ve grown up to know. Black people all know or should know history enough to know we originate from Africa, but I never imagined the results saying Benin, Congo and Cameroon. The 1% European Jewish and Germanic Europe still throws me as I wasn’t expecting that but it’s still an amazing find. My mum always swore we had Spanish blood…when I dance others also say this so it was incredible to see there’s actually a link.

My friend has also recently done a test and would now like to be known as ‘African Queen’ due to her very surprising results. Whether it’s you or your friend finding out about past generations it is beyond exciting and interesting and I believe we should all find out where we are from; whether it’s doing a DNA test or speaking to your grandparents about history. I can now go forward knowing if I ever have children or if my nephew asks I can give as much information as possible and say more than just “I’m Jamaican and Bajan”.

Updated results
Part of the map