Guide to being financially stable

The first thing to do is to list what you want and forget about what you need. For example- It is easy to say you want to move out of the family house and buy a house, however, if it’s your friends birthday on Saturday night and you are all going on a night out, do you need to buy a new outfit? This doesn’t mean you can’t live your best life and buy things whilst aiming to get a house but if you have a wardrobe full of clothes and shelves full of footwear, it’s up to you to think about whether that £50 needs to go to buying an outfit similar to what you might already have or whether that £50 can go towards a ‘help to buy’ or savings account.

If you’re in the position to buy luxuries and save at the same time due to maybe having a good-paying job, stability, inheritance, investments etc and you remain organised, then do as you please but if saving and financial knowledge for you is slacking, well this post is for you.

Make a list once a month or what you want in life; because your goals are important. When and if you go off track this will work as a reminder. Write your financial plans and goals down. If you have bills to play or need emergency money, food money etc write down your budget. If your wage allows you to put 75% into savings, go for it but never dip into your savings to take it out; therefore you need to be sure you can afford to keep putting in 75%.

Do your research and get that knowledge up! Bonds, investments, stocks, learn about different ways to save and invest and see what works for you. My financial goal is to be able to buy my own place before the age of 30, so I have investments and goals that work towards it. However, if your goal is to be able to buy a certain car or do be able to put a certain amount of money aside for your child, my plans and what I do to save and invest won’t necessarily work for you. To be financially stable and to set yourself realistic goals I will always say research is key.

Talking of goals. To write them down, you must first set them. You want that house, you better set goals to work towards it. How are you going to get that house? How are you going to fund keeping that house? How much can you put towards a mortgage? How much are bills going to cost you? Will you need to make cut backs? Can you do this alone or do you need a partner? All these questions are important and will help you to create a budget and a financially stable foundation.

Stick to these goals. Don’t just calculate money and write it all down on a piece of paper you’ll lose. Action it. Be sure to see it through. This might mean saying no to some financially heavy events from changing your holiday budget to changing your mobile phone plan (saved me £18 a month by the way). Speak it into existence.

And last but not least in connection to actioning goals, leave behind distractions. The road to success and becoming financially stable means having to prioritise. How will you do what you need to do if you spend £200 in the club every Friday night but you get paid £18k annually? Consider options. Nights in, a more cheap and cheerful motive or something as simple as not spending as much money when you’re out. Think about your life choices and get organised.

For further information on how to save or to get yourself started, please visit my contact page or Instagram Solobutterflyy.

Happy Place

I got asked a question a month ago and the question is in an abrupt ‘inform me please’ tone which I didn’t appreciate.

Why do you go to the gym?

This person then went on to say (before I could answer) “well look at you. You don’t need it”. Who are you to tell me what I need? This person had never met me before and had a very ‘self-entitled’ vibe. I don’t mind if people are curious or genuine but with her tone taken it was much of a personal dig. I responded by saying “I go for my mental health”. This person continued to say “well…why don’t you walk around the forest or ride a bike”. Again, this person doesn’t know me. If this person knew me, they would know I live in a very busy city. Where is the forest? And I can’t afford a bike on top of all the other expenses in life. Even if I could afford a bike I wouldn’t have much of a good environment to ride it in. But as she was questioning my life, I couldn’t help but think, why do I have to justify my actions to anyone.

Whether you go gym for mental health, Instagram, medical conditions etc that’s your wish and what you do in the gym is completely up to you. Whether you spend an hour only on the treadmill or spend the majority of your time lifting weights, as long as you are happy that is all that matters.

People find what works for their mental health in different places. A lot of people take up hobbies or go travelling, whereas I spend my time in the gym weight training. I like the feeling. I like going on the treadmill to think and clear my head and I like going to a gym where no one knows me and I can zone out. I know many people who go to the gym and tell me how relieved and amazing they feel once they have left. Yes, this has a lot to do with endorphins being released and cheering us up but the gym isn’t always that happy place for everyone. For example, I love shopping online and I love the feeling of something I want being delivered to me, trying it on, seeing how it looks and fits and suddenly I have a new outfit I can’t wait to wear out but that happiness is not the same happiness and me pushing my mind and body in the gym. That is the one place I can go and switch off and I can’t say that about a lot of places.

Moral of the post is, don’t let anyone question your actions. I took that question very personal because I felt the need to defend my mental health and when people ask questions like that, they don’t realise how you might interrupt it. Find your happy place and let it take care of you.